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 Post subject: Re: The "Learning English" Thread
PostPosted: March 31st, 2009, 7:00 pm 
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42317 wrote:
Is there a "Gatling idiom"?

Not that I can think of. There might be for people who're actually in the military I suppose, but ya got me. Bloodfairy may have just been making a comparison in terms of weapons rather than to a similar idiom.

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 Post subject: Re: The "Learning English" Thread
PostPosted: May 11th, 2009, 4:55 pm 
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When you think of the term "fisherman", what picture comes to your mind?

Spoiler
There seems to be no difference between the guy with rod, hook, line, and sinker, and his more industrial-professional counterpart with a net towed by his boat. I'd just like to know what comes more natural.


About a totally different matter... is the term "wanker" common or at least used to some degree in the US? Just read a novel from the UK and the term appears quite often among lower-class characters. I can't remember this expression from an American context.

I would like to add: What is correct?
"I've never heard him sing" or
"I've never heard him singing"
If both sentences are grammatical, is there a difference in meaning/nuance?

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 Post subject: Re: The "Learning English" Thread
PostPosted: May 11th, 2009, 6:17 pm 
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I think of a guy out on his boat or sitting on the side of a lake with a fishing pole in his hands. But ya, it covers either the individual fisher or a boat out casting nets to catch fish.

Wanker, not so much here in the states. That's a pretty British term, it would be odd to hear people over here saying it.

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 Post subject: Re: The "Learning English" Thread
PostPosted: May 11th, 2009, 8:46 pm 
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42317 wrote:
When you think of the term "fisherman", what picture comes to your mind?

Spoiler
There seems to be no difference between the guy with rod, hook, line, and sinker, and his more industrial-professional counterpart with a net towed by his boat. I'd just like to know what comes more natural.


I think of the guy with the single rod. Probably you would get a different answer near a harbor with a large fishing industry...

42317 wrote:
About a totally different matter... is the term "wanker" common or at least used to some degree in the US? Just read a novel from the UK and the term appears quite often among lower-class characters. I can't remember this expression from an American context.


Wanker seems to be the equivalent of 'fucker' for the Brits. We had a radio show over here hosted by Steve Jones of the Sex Pistols and often he and the British guests would have fun saying wanker over and over again. Apparently it is one of the banned words on-air in England...

42317 wrote:
I would like to add: What is correct?
"I've never heard him sing" or
"I've never heard him singing"
If both sentences are grammatical, is there a difference in meaning/nuance?


I'm no grammar expert, so both seem OK to me. Nuance-wise, I would say that "...sing" implies a single note, to sing at all; "...singing" implies a full song or effort at singing a song. If I remember, I'll ask my old roomate from college. He teaches English at UC Riverside now so at least he should have a more legitimate opinion...

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 Post subject: Re: The "Learning English" Thread
PostPosted: May 12th, 2009, 3:03 pm 
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PunkDaddy wrote:
I think of the guy with the single rod. Probably you would get a different answer near a harbor with a large fishing industry...

Is there no fishing industry in San Diego, Los Angeles, or San Francisco? :D
Hm... not all of California is "near the coastline" I guess.

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 Post subject: Re: The "Learning English" Thread
PostPosted: May 12th, 2009, 10:22 pm 
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42317 wrote:
PunkDaddy wrote:
I think of the guy with the single rod. Probably you would get a different answer near a harbor with a large fishing industry...

Is there no fishing industry in San Diego, Los Angeles, or San Francisco? :D
Hm... not all of California is "near the coastline" I guess.


We have HUGE harbors, but not much of a fishing industry. I assume that is because 1) the real estate is too expensive for big processing plants (so we have many container ships from China but very few fishing trawlers), 2) the bulk fishing probably occurs in other areas (I've often heard of New England fishermen, Gulf of Mexico fishermen, Alaskan & Pacific Northwest fleets, etc.) and 3) there's probably too much polution run-off from the big cities for commercial fishing. We do seem to have quite a few sports fishing vessels, but even half of those just head south to the warmer waters off of Mexico. Again, more guys with rods, no trawlers...

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 Post subject: Re: The "Learning English" Thread
PostPosted: May 13th, 2009, 8:51 am 
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42317 wrote:
When you think of the term "fisherman", what picture comes to your mind?
in my opinion a "fisherman" is one who makes money. it is a profession. so it is only the guy with the nets on the boat. a guy on a boat/or by a river with a single rod is just fishing. i grew up in a logging and fishing community, and i believe that is probably what most people there would also say. same goes with other jobs that end in "man". i like to fish, that does not make me a fisherman.

42317 wrote:
I would like to add: What is correct?
"I've never heard him sing" or
"I've never heard him singing"
If both sentences are grammatical, is there a difference in meaning/nuance?
they are both correct to me but different meaning. the first is straight forward where he may or may not sing. the second implies a certain case scenario where he does sing but the speaker was never present.

by the way, my english is terrible. i am only going on the basis of what "feels" right to me... haha


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 Post subject: Re: The "Learning English" Thread
PostPosted: May 14th, 2009, 1:16 pm 
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dbd_addict wrote:
by the way, my english is terrible. i am only going on the basis of what "feels" right to me... haha

That's okay... language is what is being widely used and not what's written in the dictionary.
That's how connotations and meanings change. That's a pretty cool part of otherwise boring linguistics.
Thank you so far.

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 Post subject: Re: The "Learning English" Thread
PostPosted: May 18th, 2009, 6:26 pm 
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I have some formal military language here...
What is an "EXTERNAL STANDING OPERATING PROCEDURE"?
How about "sustainment maintenance" (as opposed to "field maintenance")?
What is a "work order evacuation diskette"?
"Log Management"?
"organizational copy"?

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 Post subject: Re: The "Learning English" Thread
PostPosted: May 18th, 2009, 10:44 pm 
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42317 wrote:
I have some formal military language here...
What is an "EXTERNAL STANDING OPERATING PROCEDURE"?
How about "sustainment maintenance" (as opposed to "field maintenance")?
What is a "work order evacuation diskette"?
"Log Management"?
"organizational copy"?


i could only guess the terms since i have never served.


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 Post subject: Re: The "Learning English" Thread
PostPosted: June 4th, 2009, 1:17 pm 
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The brother of your spouse is your brother-in-law, and the sister of your spouse is your sister-in-law.
So far, so good.
What is the relationship, or how do you call the relationship between you and the sibling of the spouse of your own brother/sister?

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 Post subject: Re: The "Learning English" Thread
PostPosted: June 4th, 2009, 3:46 pm 
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42317 wrote:
The brother of your spouse is your brother-in-law, and the sister of your spouse is your sister-in-law.
So far, so good.
What is the relationship, or how do you call the relationship between you and the sibling of the spouse of your own brother/sister?


We don't really have very specific titles. There may be some specific ones, but not in common usage, so I don't know them. Essentially, if you are related to someone by marraige instead of biologically, it would be an "in-law. Thus, a "brother-in-law" could be your wife's brother or your sister's husband. The only exception I can think of would be if your parents had children before they married and you have a 'brother' to whom you are not biologically related; he would be the step-brother.

As for the formal miliarty language, I have no military experience (other than my dad is a veteran), so I was reluctant to comment. However since no one else has tossed anything out there, I'll take a stab at a few of them:

What is an "EXTERNAL STANDING OPERATING PROCEDURE"?
You probably know that Operating Procedure is a set of instructions for accomplishing a task. Standing would be orders in-place unless specifically countered. That just leaves External which could apply to people or activities outside of the unit (IE: Mr. Navy guy, here's the way you interact with the Coast Guard) or off of the base (IE: OK soldier, you're out drinking when you see an enemy soldier walking down the street in full dress and fully armed, here's what you do...). There probably is a standard definition, but I don't know what it is, just how to point you in the right direction. Knowing you, you're already that far, so I hope this isn't insulting your intelligence.

How about "sustainment maintenance" (as opposed to "field maintenance")?
I believe field maintenance would be for things that are broken such as tread replacements for tanks and other activities that would need to be done to keep the mechanism operating in the field. Sustainment maintenance would be things that need to be done but not critically like flushing anti-freeze, replacing feeder mechanisms that have not broken down but that have been used a certain number of times, etc.

What is a "work order evacuation diskette"?
This is a weird one. The least likely seems to be a "work order" (job request) for a diskette for evacuations (procedures?). I don't think there is a technical term "evacuation diskette," so that would just leave two possibilities. A designated diskette to remove work orders from a site (I don't know why work orders would need to be evacuated unless they are classified), and a diskette containing work orders that would need to be followed in the case of an evacuation such as "Burn classified documents, remove or destroy ammunition," etc.

"Log Management"?
Typically a log would be a journal or record of activity, so management of that would probably be how to keep different logs ordered and managing the information within them. I can see this required for an aircraft controll tower or something.

"organizational copy"
I think this would be a copy for everyone within the organization. Such as "Here is the organizational copy of the orders from HQ..."

Anyway, take these with a HUGE grain of salt... Do you know that expression?

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 Post subject: Re: The "Learning English" Thread
PostPosted: June 7th, 2009, 8:14 am 
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PunkDaddy wrote:
42317 wrote:
The brother of your spouse is your brother-in-law, and the sister of your spouse is your sister-in-law.
So far, so good.
What is the relationship, or how do you call the relationship between you and the sibling of the spouse of your own brother/sister?

We don't really have very specific titles. There may be some specific ones, but not in common usage, so I don't know them. Essentially, if you are related to someone by marraige instead of biologically, it would be an "in-law. Thus, a "brother-in-law" could be your wife's brother or your sister's husband. The only exception I can think of would be if your parents had children before they married and you have a 'brother' to whom you are not biologically related; he would be the step-brother.

Uh, yes... that I know.
I was just being curious because in German there is a word for the kind of relationship, you know, between you and the brother of your sibling's spouse, we call it "Schwippschwager" (pronounced like "shvip-shvaager"). It's rarely used, okay, but it's there, it's in the dictionary. Interesting enough, the first time I heard it was in the German dub of "Akira"... in the scene where Kaneda follows Kei to the rebels' hideout and Ryû asks him who he was. I'll have to take a look at it again.

PunkDaddy wrote:
Anyway, take these with a HUGE grain of salt... Do you know that expression?

Yes. :D

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 Post subject: Re: The "Learning English" Thread
PostPosted: September 2nd, 2009, 4:12 pm 
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Something came to my mind.

What you call "a pair of pants" would be "ein Paar Hosen" in German.
I didn't know about the meaning of "Hosen" until I learned English. You will notice that it looks and probably to you sounds a lot like "hoses". And that's what they are - two hoses sewn together, a hose for each leg.

But what the heck is "a pant"? :O.O:

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 Post subject: Re: The "Learning English" Thread
PostPosted: September 4th, 2009, 2:32 am 
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That's a good question. I thought I'd see what my dictionary said, but it doesn't list "pants" either.
Hmm... What an unhelpful reply...

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