Anime, Hentai, Manga, Bishoujo Games, Live Action Films, Music, Art, and Erotic Doujinshi Discussion Forum

It is currently December 17th, 2017, 12:38 pm


All times are UTC - 4 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 254 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 17  Next
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: September 18th, 2007, 8:27 am 
Offline
Resident Scholar
User avatar

Joined: May 13th, 2007, 7:57 am
Posts: 4121
Location: Trier, Germany
I actually don't know who Robert Jordan was... some kind of fantasy genre author?
And I was wondering whether I should enter a post about the passing of Luciano Pavarotti (from Associated Press, 2007/09/06).

_________________
42317
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: September 18th, 2007, 8:30 pm 
Offline
Regular

Joined: March 26th, 2007, 4:09 am
Posts: 556
Location: The Bastion of Imagination
Yeah, he was a writer of fantasy novels, one of the most well known and respected in the business.

_________________
In the end, all we have are the stories we can tell. And, if we are fortunate, somebody who will listen. - sylara{Z}


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: September 21st, 2007, 11:17 am 
Offline
Resident Scholar
User avatar

Joined: May 13th, 2007, 7:57 am
Posts: 4121
Location: Trier, Germany
From military.com, 2007/09/20

A top Pentagon official leveled sharp words at China Wednesday, reacting with some of the most candid and unambiguous language yet to that country's destruction in January of a satellite in space with a ground-launched ballistic missile.

Air Force Secretary Michael Wynne called the shoot-down an "egregious act" and said the Chinese sent a clear message to the U.S. military that its aging satellite force is under threat.

"We were not surprised, we were shocked," Wynne said at a Sept. 19 meeting hosted by the Washington, D.C.-based Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments, a defense policy think tank. "What was shocking about it was the denial."

"Was it part of a plan; was it not part of a plan?" Wynne wondered. "That's what was shocking about it."
Wynne said the shoot-down of a 1990's-era Chinese weather satellite in polar orbit has forced astronauts aboard the international space station to avoid the debris field scattered in the intercept, and he concluded that China now claims space as a legitimate battlefield.

Future enemies
"want to make sure that you will not want to get involved" in a conflict, Wynne reasoned.

"They can pin-prick you, they can threaten you - as China has with shoot-down of the satellite - just to tell us 'you don't think you're safe up there,'" he said. "Space is not a sanctuary anymore."

The Chinese government was silent on the shoot-down - and the international condemnation that resulted - for weeks after the Jan. 11 hit, and has been murky on the issue ever since. In June, U.S. Joint Chiefs chairman Gen. Peter Pace said he had not raised the issue with his Chinese counterparts during a meeting in May.

A Pentagon report released this summer assessing the Chinese military said the test was an example of China's pursuit of asymmetric countermeasures to American military prowess.

"The test put at risk the assets of all space faring nations and posed dangers to human space flight due to the creation of an unprecedented amount of debris," the report stated. "The direct ascent ASAT system is one component of a multi-dimensional program to generate the capability to deny others access to outer space."

Wynne's comments are some of the strongest yet from a senior Pentagon official and indicate how seriously the military considers Chinese anti-satellite weapons development. America's increasing reliance on space-borne assets to guide weapons, conduct long-range communications and keep an all-seeing eye on potential enemies could become the Pentagon's Achilles Heel in a future conflict, many analysts fear.

The move prompted Air Force planners to redouble their efforts to come up with ways to defend U.S. space assets from destruction. But officials are reluctant to replace a $1.5 billion satellite, only to have it destroyed by a $100 million ASAT missile.

"If space comes under attack, maybe we don't want to put up big, expensive retainer forces, maybe all we want to put up is just enough to kick the crap out of whoever shot at our satellite - kind of send a message to them," Wynne said. "And then we'll put up another expensive satellite."

Other experts wonder whether the Pentagon could reduce its dependence on satellite systems - particularly those used for GPS navigation - and position more assets in the atmosphere, leaving fewer targets for enemy ASAT weapons to hit.

Whatever defensive solution is adopted, the Air Force faces an aging fleet of satellites that are running out of fuel to keep them in orbit, Wynne said. Now, the service is faced with a potential investment of $20 billion per year to replace its space-borne fleet in the face of an aggressive threat from ASAT weapons.

"Right now, the satellites have gone up all in a peaceful mode," Wynne said. "I do think we should have some defensive mechanisms, but it is very hard to defend a satellite you're actually trying to talk to."

------------------

First, an interesting thing is the US ranting about the unprecedented amount of debris: Space traffic has already put so much debris into orbit that launching, flying and landing any crate out there has to be calculated very carefully. The destruction of anyone single satellite will hardly mean a serious further danger, except for the fact that most debris' course is more or less already integrated into any of said calculations whereas this new, Chinese debris has been added unappointedly.

Second, I don't understand what all the hot air about military threats in space is about. To give you a fitting example: Imagine the USA complaining just before World War I that the Germans had dared to develop an anti-aircraft gun, saying these would endanger peaceful air travel!
(The example is fitting because planes had originally been introduced into armed forces as a means of reconnaisance, just like today's satellites.)
It has been pretty clear since the 1980s that space, or earth's orbital regions, would be part of the next war between technologically advanced powers, and now we have an article that reads like anybody was surprised by the concept of destroying satellites as a means of denying information and communication to the enemy. Hell, there are mini-satellites out there the job of which is, in case of war, to dock on to bigger satellites and blast them to bits. It's pretty certain that the Chinese already have that technology, I can hardly imagine they'd have to rely on distractable instruments like missiles.
Plus, is there anybody who would believe that the United States have no means at all to attack other nations' orbital property themselves?

This article just boils up old, very old points about the whole matter but misses to realize itself as an add-on to the already existing information situation. Anything like that you could have already read when president Reagan came up with the Space Defense Installation, SDI, also called "the StarWars program", the difference being that the criticists of the upcoming technology are today placed in the USA as they would be at the receiving end of the line and not vice versa.

_________________
42317
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: September 21st, 2007, 1:34 pm 
Offline
Resident Admin
User avatar

Joined: March 11th, 2007, 11:19 am
Posts: 2452
Location: In the Tardis, off to who knows where in who knows when!
42317 wrote:
I actually don't know who Robert Jordan was... some kind of fantasy genre author?
And I was wondering whether I should enter a post about the passing of Luciano Pavarotti (from Associated Press, 2007/09/06).


Link doesn't work, but DAMN! I was a fan of his, and I knew he wasn't well, but it makes me sad to hear that he is gone. :( R.I.P. Luciano Pavarotti! You will be missed.

_________________
Animetric Owner and Reviewer | My Anime List
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: October 5th, 2007, 2:56 am 
Offline
Resident Admin
User avatar

Joined: March 11th, 2007, 11:19 am
Posts: 2452
Location: In the Tardis, off to who knows where in who knows when!
"In the first US trial to challenge the illegal downloading of music on the Internet, a single mother from Minnesota was ordered Thursday to pay $220,000 for sharing 24 songs online."

News Video in the link below:

http://www.breitbart.tv/html/6396.html

She had actually downloaded 1700, but they only decided to sue her for 24 of them. Looks like she should have settled outside of court like everyone else.

_________________
Animetric Owner and Reviewer | My Anime List
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: October 26th, 2007, 6:58 am 
Offline
Resident Scholar
User avatar

Joined: May 13th, 2007, 7:57 am
Posts: 4121
Location: Trier, Germany
This is from ANN:

Results of a Japanese poll concerning the regulation of child porn in Manga and arts

_________________
42317
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: October 26th, 2007, 8:42 am 
Offline
Major Contributor
User avatar

Joined: April 26th, 2007, 7:33 pm
Posts: 1210
Location: Austin, Texas
Quote:
90.9% said that harmful materials on the Internet should be regulated


That seems to be pretty similar to the net neutrality issues here in the States. And while I'm all for clamping down on the kiddie porn, regulating the internet just doesn't seem to be a good idea. It's a jurisdictional nightmare on one hand and an almost impossible task to implement on the other. Not to mention free speech issues. Though I suppose getting ISPs involved would at least make such a task relatively more feasible, emphasis on "relatively."

_________________
Image
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: October 26th, 2007, 5:51 pm 
Offline
Resident Scholar
User avatar

Joined: May 13th, 2007, 7:57 am
Posts: 4121
Location: Trier, Germany
spazmaster666 wrote:
while I'm all for clamping down on the kiddie porn, regulating the internet just doesn't seem to be a good idea.

Because: Who should decide what "harmful materials" (in general) actually are?

_________________
42317
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: October 26th, 2007, 6:44 pm 
Offline
Post Master

Joined: March 18th, 2007, 4:11 am
Posts: 1512
Location: British Columbia, Canada
42317 wrote:

I don't see the point of that, no matter what theres going to be lolicon on some sites, such as aerisdies. I hate that site now, its so slow and full of ads causing people to upload garbage so they can get their ad-frees, theres no moderator to discard the low-quality shit.

_________________
Myanimelist.net List


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: October 26th, 2007, 8:24 pm 
Offline
Regular

Joined: March 26th, 2007, 4:09 am
Posts: 556
Location: The Bastion of Imagination
Not to mention that if people decide to regulate (read: ban) the depiction of sexual abuse of fictional minors in creative works, we'd be going down a very slippery slope. Does that mean that authors or playwriters who write about child sexual abuse are liable? What about terrorism? Is a story where fictional terrorists blow up the Statue of Liberty an incitement for real terrorists to do just that? :roll:

_________________
In the end, all we have are the stories we can tell. And, if we are fortunate, somebody who will listen. - sylara{Z}


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: October 27th, 2007, 3:58 pm 
Offline
Resident Scholar
User avatar

Joined: May 13th, 2007, 7:57 am
Posts: 4121
Location: Trier, Germany
Zaxares wrote:
Is a story where fictional terrorists blow up the Statue of Liberty an incitement for real terrorists to do just that?

I guess that's a kind of discussion that will go on forever. It's less likely to happen in the US I think, because laws over there leave more responsibility to the individual. Well, I haven't actually read it myself, but in culture studies (USA) our South-Carolina-born teacher said it was perfectly okay in the States to call for someone's removal (read: murder), because the state trusts its citizens will recognize the action of killing as a despicable and unlawful act, even if the demagogue says otherwise (like "In the name of the Lord, we must weed out these pagans!").
Sounds logical to me, only those who actually try or kill a person will be prosecuted. Only fair.
Over here in the Federal Republic of Germany calling for someone's murder or harm in any kind of way is a criminal act which will be prosecuted - im memory of the Third Reich.

On the other hand, the discussion about the banning of certain media or particular movies and games is as loud over here as in the US, especially among certain conservative politicians in the government who want carte blanche for online searches of personal computers... in the name of fighting terrorism of course.

_________________
42317
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: November 28th, 2007, 8:12 pm 
Offline
Resident Admin
User avatar

Joined: March 11th, 2007, 11:19 am
Posts: 2452
Location: In the Tardis, off to who knows where in who knows when!
I want to get me one of these :)

http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/tech/2 ... oldier.ksl

_________________
Animetric Owner and Reviewer | My Anime List
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: November 28th, 2007, 8:40 pm 
Offline
Regular
User avatar

Joined: September 13th, 2007, 2:17 pm
Posts: 569
That's pretty cool!

_________________
"DUDE you got the jesus bling! That's like the bling that died for all the other blings' sin!"

Dr. Insane-o


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: November 30th, 2007, 1:53 pm 
Offline
Resident Scholar
User avatar

Joined: May 13th, 2007, 7:57 am
Posts: 4121
Location: Trier, Germany
Acmurphy wrote:
http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/tech/2007/11/27/yeates.ut.robo.soldier.ksl

They didn't say a word about power supply... and that's pretty suspicious.
You can see a power (?) line attached to the exosceleton, and battle fields ain't quite as simple as Tokyo 3...

_________________
42317
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: November 30th, 2007, 2:03 pm 
Offline
Resident Admin
User avatar

Joined: March 11th, 2007, 11:19 am
Posts: 2452
Location: In the Tardis, off to who knows where in who knows when!
Towards the end they said the end unit would be 100% portable with it's own backpack power supply. What type of power supply I have no idea, but they must have something I would gather. Given they said that though, it does look like the unit we saw in the video was hooked up to a power supply.

_________________
Animetric Owner and Reviewer | My Anime List
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 254 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 17  Next

All times are UTC - 4 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group