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 Post subject: Re: 42317 - The Numerologist's introduction
PostPosted: August 21st, 2010, 12:55 am 
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now, this IS strange. I remember the old forums too, though back then i was takayuki_yamano. Your name, along with Spaz, Cypher, and a few others, I remember, so hello! :)


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 Post subject: Re: 42317 - The Numerologist's introduction
PostPosted: August 23rd, 2010, 9:55 am 
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Thanks for remembering me. Takayuki Yamano does ring a bell, too.

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 Post subject: Re: 42317 - The Numerologist's introduction
PostPosted: August 29th, 2010, 10:07 pm 
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Acmurphy wrote:
Very nice work 42317! I can only imagine how happy you must feel finally being done with it after all the time and effort you had to put in. What exactly are you looking for a job in now that you've finished?


I second Acmurphy's congratulations and his curiosity. Are you shooting to be a translator? A teacher? A salaryman in Japan? :mrgreen: I have a friend in Japan right now who is teaching English. He didn't even study Japanese in college- he was a Chinese major for undergrad! Not only what are you considering, but where?

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 Post subject: Re: 42317 - The Numerologist's introduction
PostPosted: September 6th, 2010, 5:09 pm 
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PunkDaddy wrote:
I second Acmurphy's congratulations and his curiosity.

Thanks for both anyways. :lol:

PunkDaddy wrote:
Are you shooting to be a translator? A teacher? A salaryman in Japan?

My skills in Japanese are of a conversational sort. I can say what I need to say and I can understand the gist of most answers (unless the speaker has a sort of odd dialect or jargon). I'm not fit for negotiations of a more specific matter, so no Salaryman for me. I said before that I was a rather unmotivated student.
Something similar goes for the translator idea. I can translate written works from Japanese but I'm not quick enough for good spoken dialogue translations.
A teacher, yes, that's an option...

PunkDaddy wrote:
I have a friend in Japan right now who is teaching English. He didn't even study Japanese in college- he was a Chinese major for undergrad!

I suppose he's a native speaker of English. That's all he needs. It's a sort of miracle that one of the legally most regulated and restrictive countries in the world would have such lax conditions for becoming an English teacher: You need to be a native speaker or you have to have studied the language, like I did, assuming that gives you near-native speaking abilities, like I'm told I have.

PunkDaddy wrote:
Not only what are you considering, but where?

I'm considering almost everything, on the condition that I can ciommunicate with the people.
It's just half the world where either me or my girlfriend would refuse to go. For example she wouldn't go to Africa, not even South Africa which is a stable state, but Africa still sounds too much like civil war, despotism, gang violence, and AIDS.
She has similar reservations about South America, although I heard that Argentina wasn't half bad.
Any Muslim country is taboo for her, and I can't convince her that "Muslim" is not necessarily a fundamentalist haven like Saudi Arabia or Iran.
I don't have many reservations, but to be honest I would not want to work and live in the United States. Me and my liberal, atheist mouth would probably very soon run into problems with the born-again neighbors. Going there for an assignment is okay, but not for years or anything like that. I really dislike the omnipresence of religious and national references in public.

Then again I would not mind working for the US Army. It sounds paradoxical to you, I guess. But the main base is close to my hometown, they pay well, and should I be fed up with someone who's really into Jesus and being proud of his lovable, single greatest country in the world I will still know that at the end of the day I can return to what's normal for me.
I have also applied for a job at the German Ministry of Defense, the "department for protection of the constitution" (the domestic intelligence agency), the Lufthansa (the most snobbish German airline) and for whatever nonspecific job Amazon had to offer me. A dozen applications so far, all online.

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 Post subject: Re: 42317 - The Numerologist's introduction
PostPosted: September 6th, 2010, 5:32 pm 
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42317 wrote:
PunkDaddy wrote:
I have a friend in Japan right now who is teaching English. He didn't even study Japanese in college- he was a Chinese major for undergrad!

I suppose he's a native speaker of English. That's all he needs. It's a sort of miracle that one of the legally most regulated and restrictive countries in the world would have such lax conditions for becoming an English teacher: You need to be a native speaker or you have to have studied the language, like I did, assuming that gives you near-native speaking abilities, like I'm told I have.

Yes, he is a native speaker with a Master's degree in teaching English with a specialization in English as a second language. Still, he's not very functional in Japanese (or wasn't a year ago, he may be by now). I would imagine there might be some demand for a tri-lingual German/English/Japanese teacher, but I also can see how finding that specific of a job might be very challenging.

42317 wrote:
PunkDaddy wrote:
Not only what are you considering, but where?

I'm considering almost everything, on the condition that I can communicate with the people.
It's just half the world where either me or my girlfriend would refuse to go. For example she wouldn't go to Africa, not even South Africa which is a stable state, but Africa still sounds too much like civil war, despotism, gang violence, and AIDS.
She has similar reservations about South America, although I heard that Argentina wasn't half bad.
Any Muslim country is taboo for her, and I can't convince her that "Muslim" is not necessarily a fundamentalist haven like Saudi Arabia or Iran.
I don't have many reservations, but to be honest I would not want to work and live in the United States. Me and my liberal, atheist mouth would probably very soon run into problems with the born-again neighbors. Going there for an assignment is okay, but not for years or anything like that. I really dislike the omnipresence of religious and national references in public.

I can totally understand and relate to your concern. I would share your girlfriend’s reservations regarding Africa and the Middle East. I’m much more familiar with South America (my grandmother was from Columbia), and while I think Peru, Brazil, Chile and Argentina would be stable and reasonable, unless you are fluent in Spanish or Portuguese, it may be quite a challenge.

As for the US, well, all I can say is that you can find anything in the big cities. The smaller towns can be less flexible, for better or worse. You will find super-conservative, right-wing religious areas (as with your concern), but also hyper-liberal vegetarian communes (especially Oregon, Northern California and parts of the East Coast). I am most familiar with Los Angeles, where literally, you can find whatever you want to find and whatever you don’t want to find as well. I am agnostic, fiscally conservative and socially liberal so sometimes, other parents annoy me with their righteousness. Of course, there are the other parents whose kids have Mohawk haircuts and the parents have tattoos covering most of their visible skin with > 20 visible piercings. We have little Vietnam, Korea-town, so on and so forth. I would not worry for you socially, but I might worry for you economically. The LA public transportation sucks, and the rent in the nicer neighborhoods is quite expensive. New York or Boston might be a better fit (good public transportation, liberal majority, etc.).

42317 wrote:
Then again I would not mind working for the US Army. It sounds paradoxical to you, I guess. But the main base is close to my hometown, they pay well, and should I be fed up with someone who's really into Jesus and being proud of his lovable, single greatest country in the world I will still know that at the end of the day I can return to what's normal for me.
I have also applied for a job at the German Ministry of Defense, the "department for protection of the constitution" (the domestic intelligence agency), the Lufthansa (the most snobbish German airline) and for whatever nonspecific job Amazon had to offer me. A dozen applications so far, all online.


Hehehe. Not a paradox at all. It is one thing to work somewhere you don’t really love, but another to LIVE there! In any case, I hope you find something that suits you soon.

Gambarre amigo!
8)

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 Post subject: Re: 42317 - The Numerologist's introduction
PostPosted: September 7th, 2010, 6:01 pm 
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PunkDaddy wrote:
Yes, he is a native speaker with a Master's degree in teaching English with a specialization in English as a second language. Still, he's not very functional in Japanese (or wasn't a year ago, he may be by now).

It's totally reasonable from their point of view. If your foreign language teacher doesn't speak your language well you are forced to deal with him and any curricular problems in the tongue you are supposed to learn anyway.
One of my Japanese teachers in Hirosaki surprised me like that. The language in class was strictly Japanese, but one day I had a problem with "-te-aru" and "-te-oru" verb flexion nuances and I didn't get it when she explained it to me. She asked me to wait for her at the end of class and when everybody else had gone she explained the nuances to me in perfectly accent-free American English. I was almost too stunned to listen to her explanations, but I realized the plan behind such "secretive" behavior, covering her language skills for the better of her English-speaking students.
JET veterans will often tell you that they don't really want you to speak Japanese fluently or know too much about Japan if you're willing to work as a teacher of English there.

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 Post subject: Re: 42317 - The Numerologist's introduction
PostPosted: September 8th, 2010, 1:56 am 
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42317 wrote:
PunkDaddy wrote:
Yes, he is a native speaker with a Master's degree in teaching English with a specialization in English as a second language. Still, he's not very functional in Japanese (or wasn't a year ago, he may be by now).

It's totally reasonable from their point of view. If your foreign language teacher doesn't speak your language well you are forced to deal with him and any curricular problems in the tongue you are supposed to learn anyway.
One of my Japanese teachers in Hirosaki surprised me like that. The language in class was strictly Japanese, but one day I had a problem with "-te-aru" and "-te-oru" verb flexion nuances and I didn't get it when she explained it to me. She asked me to wait for her at the end of class and when everybody else had gone she explained the nuances to me in perfectly accent-free American English. I was almost too stunned to listen to her explanations, but I realized the plan behind such "secretive" behavior, covering her language skills for the better of her English-speaking students.
JET veterans will often tell you that they don't really want you to speak Japanese fluently or know too much about Japan if you're willing to work as a teacher of English there.


That makes total sense. But it does seem like it would be very hard to live somewhere where you don't speak the language.

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 Post subject: Re: 42317 - The Numerologist's introduction
PostPosted: September 10th, 2010, 2:44 pm 
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PunkDaddy wrote:
But it does seem like it would be very hard to live somewhere where you don't speak the language.

How much language do you have to know for your everyday needs?
Shopping, maybe eating out... contact with municipal or state authorities might be tricky, but how often do you need to contact them face to face? Less restrictive countries like Germany or the US make it even easier for expatriates: Some groups of foreign origin (e.g. your Hispanics, our Turks) are so big that they form communities in bigger towns that are virtually autonomous, further undermining the need to learn the country's first language.
It's of course harder in Japan where the foreign community is relatively small due to the strict immigration policy.

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 Post subject: Re: 42317 - The Numerologist's introduction
PostPosted: September 16th, 2010, 1:19 pm 
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42317 wrote:
PunkDaddy wrote:
But it does seem like it would be very hard to live somewhere where you don't speak the language.

How much language do you have to know for your everyday needs?
Shopping, maybe eating out... contact with municipal or state authorities might be tricky, but how often do you need to contact them face to face? Less restrictive countries like Germany or the US make it even easier for expatriates: Some groups of foreign origin (e.g. your Hispanics, our Turks) are so big that they form communities in bigger towns that are virtually autonomous, further undermining the need to learn the country's first language.
It's of course harder in Japan where the foreign community is relatively small due to the strict immigration policy.


I suppose so. After all, my in-laws have lived here for 30 years without really learning English. I guess it is more than a language issue in my mind. Your reply made me consider even moving within the US and how difficult it would be for me to live in a rural area. I speak English fine, but my mentality would be foreign. I'm having trouble finding the words... it would be difficult to find common ground to communicate even though we share the same language.

On the flip side, strictly talking about language, 90% of the time, a small number of words would be fine to get by in everyday life. It is when things go wrong that it becomes difficult. The traffic stop with the policeman, the problem at the bank, going to the hospital, etc. My in-laws constantly call one of their kids to take them to the doctor because they cannot express themselves safely.


In any case, we have wandered off of the topic. Which is wishing you a bright and bountiful future (and being nosy about following your path). Good luck!

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 Post subject: Re: 42317 - The Numerologist's introduction
PostPosted: September 17th, 2010, 5:43 pm 
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PunkDaddy wrote:
In any case, we have wandered off of the topic. Which is wishing you a bright and bountiful future (and being nosy about following your path). Good luck!

You are honest about it, so it's okay. Many applications have been rejected, others are still in the race. I'll fill you in once I have definite information.

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 Post subject: Re: 42317 - The Numerologist's introduction
PostPosted: September 28th, 2010, 7:08 am 
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Among other jobs I have applied for a job as a texter at GameForge. Due to a misunderstanding on my side I sent them an English example of what I can do (the "Cycling" story that I submitted for the short story contest), but something made them curious enough to actually call me and ask for a German sample, which they actually wanted. Looks like my stated desired salary of 2000 E per month (roughly 2700 USD) wasn't set too high.
This is a job that I can do, I'm sure, since the game concepts (i.e. the basic fragments like Storm_Shinobi offers them from time to time) come from other people and I "only" fill in the blanks. :D
Question is whether they'll like my German samples. It is a gaming company after all and my German creations are somewhat serious in tone.

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 Post subject: Re: 42317 - The Numerologist's introduction
PostPosted: November 17th, 2010, 6:52 pm 
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Applying for jobs is sorta gruesome. Luckily it can most often be done online, so it doesn't cost any money. I wrote about 75 applications and not even ten were on paper. So far none of them were successfull, but it's better to try and fail than not trying at all.

Most of the vacant jobs I find are strictly speaking not for beginners. Either they are looking for a sort of specialist, like an accountant, an engineer, sales, marketing, what have you, or they say like "You need X years of experience in the specified field", and if it's not even that they go like "We expect you to have an excellent above-average diploma". Yeah, have a nice day, folks.
But some day I'll find a place. I just wonder what kida place it's gonna be.
Japan would be awesome, no doubt.

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 Post subject: Re: 42317 - The Numerologist's introduction
PostPosted: March 13th, 2011, 7:50 pm 
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On the 8th of March I received a call from an English-speaking gentleman who asked whether I'd be willing to come visit him for a job interview... on the 10th. In a town called Oberammergau (famous for its Passion Plays since 1634) - which is about 300 miles down south near the Austrian border. I requested that he give me two hours to arrange funds and people and he agreed to call me back. I had not yet understood what organization he represented but I was sure he was talking about one of my US Army job applications.

In the following hours I moved heaven and hell to make it possible. I was offered a telephone interview also but I thought it'd make a better impression if I came in person, besides I like travelling by car. I called friends and family to organize a car, money, and a place to stay over night, I called the labour exchange to make sure they'd reimburse me for my travel expenses. They told me I needed a written invitation from the employer, but I could also bring that afterwards.

The following day, the 9th, I received another call from the gentlemen and we exchanged the necessary information. I'd then be having a job interview at NATO School at Oberammergau on the following day. I mounted a train shortly after and rode home, borrowing my grandfather's car and a hundred bucks for gas (what they call a gallon in the US costs more than 6 EUR/8 USD). I made a surprise visit to a friend's house and occupied his computer for an hour, downloading all the necessary information I could find about NATO School and the corner stones of NATO itself, all in all 25 pages written in a small font. The rest of the day passed with learning these facts and before I went to bed I checked the navigation device. It said it'd take me almost five hours to get there and I decided to reckon with six hours, plus two hours which I wanted to spend going over my data once more.

In the morning of March 10th I mounted the car and hit the Autobahn - where I got my first ticket for speeding. I passed a truck at 120 (75 mph) and while doing so a sign gave a limit of 100. When I had passed the truck the next sign said 80. I took the foot from the accelerator, but when I saw the flash I was still going at about 100. I haven't received the bill yet but I'm expecting between 30 and 50 EUR.

A few hours later the navigator said I should exit the Autobahn near Kempten, in order to travel the remaining 20 km on a country road. But the Autobahn was newer than the map in the navigator and this exit did not exist anymore. It seems to have vanished when this particular Autobahn was being completed. So I drove on for several miles, into a tunnel, and when I left the tunnel I read a sign "Welcome to Austria!".
Luckily the navigator included Austrian roads, so I got a nice view of the Alps and eventually closed in on Oberammergau from the southwest instead of northwest. I was somewhat upset because I had forgotten to bring my camera.
I arrived shortly after 1300, almost six hours after I had departed. I took a rest and rehearsed my stuff.

At about 1600 I met the guy who had called me, a USAF master sergeant, and judging by his telephone voice I would not have expected a fove-foot-five black person. Looking around I came to the conclusion that the average US soldiers don't make a really military impression. The atmosphere was way more relaxed (laid-back?) than what I remember from my days in a German uniform. And as nice as they seemed they also fed some old clichés. Soldier A asked me where I was coming from for a little smalltalk. I told him what federal state I was from and he didn't know it (there are only 16). So I told him I was from Trier, which he didn't know either. So I desperately tried "Bitburg" which is situated a few kilometers north of Trier and has a USAF base nearby. Aha, that he did recognize (unless he did not want to come out as a total nobrainer and faked it). A minute after that soldier B entered the office where I was waiting and handed in a written request. It turned out that he had the word "request" misspelled ("reqest"). I tried to keep a poker face and amused myself greatly.

Shortly after I met the interview board - consisting of a German colonel, a German lieutenant-colonel, a German female bureaucrat, and the only American was the beforementioned USAF master sergeant. I was a little confused because I had sent my application to the Army, while the USAF had its own website with job offers.
The interview was conducted in English, whyever. The lady didn't ask me anything, most talking was done by the German officers, and their accent and grammar were a pain in my ears ("Thank you for your informations.").

Anyways, they asked the usual questions: Why did you apply for this job? What are your so-far experiences in the field (of e-learning)? What are your personal strengths? How would you deal with mobbing/bullying? What would you do if you received an order to complete a project within only four days? How would you decide whether you had done a good job after a year of employment? Why do you think you are the best-suited candidate?
Well, I was told that I'd learn their decision in three weeks or so, but I think I totally bombed it. Instead of praising the beauty of the area and singing hymns about the good reputation of NATO school, where employment for me could only be compared to a video game geek receiving a job offer from Nintendo, I indeed told them that the job offer had sounded general enough for my background and that I simply wanted to get a foothold on the job market. That was so incredibly stupid it should have hurt! It's always the same in any oral examination situation: I get too nervous and forget half of what I rehearsed. I think the only half-way good answer that I came up with was that it would be foolish for me to pretend I was the best applicant but that I would do the job earnestly to the best of my abilities.
After arranging the necessary paperwork for my reimbursement I headed home. The interview had taken 20 minutes.

I spent the night in Stuttgart at a friend's apartment whom I know from my army days, and who is just as jobless as I am while having only basic education. We drank some wine and exchanged our experiences with the labor exchange, but soon I could not keep my eyes open anymore and we went to sleep.
He awoke before me and when I got up at 10 AM he showed me what videos already existed from the armageddon-like situation in Japan. I was shocked and became somewhat restless. He didn't have Japanese language support installed and I did not want to bother him with that, so I left sooner than planned and battled another three hours of sometimes thick traffic before I arrived at my grandfather's. I immediately got on the train and returned to Trier to follow any news about the flood disaster.
I spent the 12th writing mails to everybody I know in Japan and a number of other folks, and writing my blog entry (the long German version of what you read right now).

As for job interviews I have at least learned a few things: I need to take notes instead of just rehearsing. I have a good number of personal (mostly social) strengths and it's a waste of effort and time that I cannot remember a single one when I'm asked that question! Dammit, even confidence in orthography and grammar should be in the list because I'm under the impression that this point is not as self-evident as it looks from my personal angle. When I prepare my answers - to questions that I know will come - I have time to think of innuendos and witty remarks and anecdotes and all that but whenever I am in an exam situation the scaffold just comes crashing down on me and I'm left with fragments that hardly make sense or that are simply destructive to my cause.
So I might have returned still without a job but I also think that I am smarter than I was before and I'll be able to use that experience in an interview to come.

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 Post subject: Re: 42317 - The Numerologist's introduction
PostPosted: May 29th, 2011, 12:30 pm 
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My job search has resulted in a small success. I am currently working as a transport driver delivering about 1200 pounds of parcels every day. It doesn't offer much pay but it's enough to get off welfare aid and driving is fun. It's a daily 250 - 300 km ride and the van has a CD player. I can also use it to commute the 10 km or so between the depot and my apartment block, so I have no commuting costs. And while we have a work uniform we don't have to look neat as a pin like the colleagues from UPS. :P2:

The downside is that I get up at 0415, work starts at 0530, sorting out parcels and loading the van until about 0800, and I get home at about 1800, which leaves me three and a half hours to take a shower, eat, have a chat with my girlfriend, write e-mails and do other necessary stuff before I go back to bed at 2130. I will get home earlier, though, once I have internalized all the routines because I lose time looking for the different villages and towns, in that case 1700 and even 1630 becomes realistic.

So for the following weeks, hopefully not too many, Animetric becomes a weekend pastime, because, honestly, I don't have the time to drop in between Monday and Friday, and spending an hour watching Anime and writing about it is currently completely out of the question.

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 Post subject: Re: 42317 - The Numerologist's introduction
PostPosted: June 5th, 2011, 11:05 am 
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42317 wrote:
So I might have returned still without a job but I also think that I am smarter than I was before and I'll be able to use that experience in an interview to come.
Yes, the only way to advance is to look forward and learn from our mistakes.

42317 wrote:
My job search has resulted in a small success. I am currently working as a transport driver delivering about 1200 pounds of parcels every day.
That's a lot of parcels to deliver!!

42317 wrote:
... while we have a work uniform we don't have to look neat as a pin like the colleagues from UPS.
I always thought the UPS uniform was pretty cool, it looks pretty rugged with boots and all.

Good luck 42137! Hopefully you'll be able to land the kind of job you want soon. Meanwhile drive safe and enjoy the ride!

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Last edited by wolfwood on June 5th, 2011, 11:08 am, edited 2 times in total.

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